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Welcome to our blog, where guest authors and QAA specialists discuss issues which really matter for our sector, in the UK and around the world.

Postcard from our latest PSRB Forum

25 April 2019


Maureen McLaughlin, Head of Universities & Standards, QAA



What is a PSRB (not to be confused with Spanish musician PBSR)? For those of you not familiar with the term, PSRBs are a diverse group including professional bodies, regulators and those with statutory authority over a particular profession.

Halfway up the stairs: A progress report on the current Enhancement Theme in Scotland

16 April 2019


Ailsa Crum, Head of Quality and Enhancement, QAA Scotland



Fans of A A Milne will understand that right here, halfway through the current Enhancement Theme in Scotland, is an ideal place to sit and consider the steps we've taken towards our goal of improving the student experience.


What we mean when we talk about quality assurance of 'UK HE'

9 April 2019


James Harrison, Policy Officer, QAA



The term 'UK HE' is used a lot but, in a devolved system, what does it actually mean when it comes to quality assurance?
QAA was founded in 1997 and, today, we're the independent quality body for the UK, across its four nations. In the years since 1997, there have been fundamental shifts in how higher education policies and practices work, as Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland became devolved from central government.

Combatting essay mills and academic misconduct

2 April 2019


Gareth Crossman, Head of Policy & Public Affairs, QAA



You don't usually expect university leaders to draw attention to issues that might carry reputational risk for them. So when 45 Vice Chancellors and sector representatives wrote to the Secretary of State for Education last year, asking him to act against essay mills, it was a telling moment. To their credit, the signatories were aware that cheating in higher education is a significant and, it appears, growing problem. A few years ago, they might have been reluctant to draw attention to the possibility of cheating at their institutions.